Publications

2017
Housden BE, Li Z, Kelley C, Wang Y, Hu Y, Valvezan AJ, et al. Improved detection of synthetic lethal interactions in Drosophila cells using variable dose analysis (VDA). Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017;114 (50) :E10755-E10762. Abstract
Synthetic sick or synthetic lethal (SS/L) screens are a powerful way to identify candidate drug targets to specifically kill tumor cells, but this approach generally suffers from low consistency between screens. We found that many SS/L interactions involve essential genes and are therefore detectable within a limited range of knockdown efficiency. Such interactions are often missed by overly efficient RNAi reagents. We therefore developed an assay that measures viability over a range of knockdown efficiency within a cell population. This method, called Variable Dose Analysis (VDA), is highly sensitive to viability phenotypes and reproducibly detects SS/L interactions. We applied the VDA method to search for SS/L interactions with TSC1 and TSC2, the two tumor suppressors underlying tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), and generated a SS/L network for TSC. Using this network, we identified four Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs that selectively affect viability of TSC-deficient cells, representing promising candidates for repurposing to treat TSC-related tumors.
2017_PNAS_Housden.pdf 2017_PNAS_Housden_Supp. Info.pdf 2017_PNAS_Housden_Supp. Datasets.zip
Mohr SE, Rudd K, Hu Y, Song WR, Gilly Q, Buckner M, et al. Zinc Detoxification: A Functional Genomics and Transcriptomics Analysis in Drosophila melanogaster Cultured Cells. G3 (Bethesda). 2017;Abstract
Cells require some metals, such as zinc and manganese, but excess levels of these metals can be toxic. As a result, cells have evolved complex mechanisms for maintaining metal homeostasis and surviving metal intoxication. Here, we present the results of a large-scale functional genomic screen in Drosophila cultured cells for modifiers of zinc chloride toxicity, together with transcriptomics data for wildtype or genetically zinc-sensitized cells challenged with mild zinc chloride supplementation. Altogether, we identified 47 genes for which knockdown conferred sensitivity or resistance to toxic zinc or manganese chloride treatment, and more than 1800 putative zinc-responsive genes. Analysis of the 'omics data points to the relevance of ion transporters, glutathione-related factors, and conserved disease-associated genes in zinc detoxification. Specific genes identified in the zinc screen include orthologs of human disease-associated genes CTNS, PTPRN (also known as IA-2), and ATP13A2 (also known as PARK9). We show that knockdown of red dog mine (rdog; CG11897), a candidate zinc detoxification gene encoding an ABCC-type transporter family protein related to yeast cadmium factor (YCF1), confers sensitivity to zinc intoxication in cultured cells and that rdog is transcriptionally up-regulated in response to zinc stress. As there are many links between the biology of zinc and other metals and human health, the 'omics datasets presented here provide a resource that will allow researchers to explore metal biology in the context of diverse health-relevant processes.
2017_G3_Mohr.pdf Supplemental Files.zip
Hu Y, Vinayagam A, Nand A, Comjean A, Chung V, Hao T, et al. Molecular Interaction Search Tool (MIST): an integrated resource for mining gene and protein interaction data. Nucleic Acids Res. 2017;Abstract
Model organism and human databases are rich with information about genetic and physical interactions. These data can be used to interpret and guide the analysis of results from new studies and develop new hypotheses. Here, we report the development of the Molecular Interaction Search Tool (MIST; http://fgrtools.hms.harvard.edu/MIST/). The MIST database integrates biological interaction data from yeast, nematode, fly, zebrafish, frog, rat and mouse model systems, as well as human. For individual or short gene lists, the MIST user interface can be used to identify interacting partners based on protein-protein and genetic interaction (GI) data from the species of interest as well as inferred interactions, known as interologs, and to view a corresponding network. The data, interologs and search tools at MIST are also useful for analyzing 'omics datasets. In addition to describing the integrated database, we also demonstrate how MIST can be used to identify an appropriate cut-off value that balances false positive and negative discovery, and present use-cases for additional types of analysis. Altogether, the MIST database and search tools support visualization and navigation of existing protein and GI data, as well as comparison of new and existing data.
2017_Nuc Acids Res_Hu.pdf Supplement.pdf
Anderson WP, Anderson WP. Data management: A global coalition to sustain core data. Nature. 2017;543 (7644) :179. Abstract
Collaborators: Cochrane G, Di Francesco V, Donohue T, Durinx C, Game A, Green E, Gojobori T, Goodhand P, Hamosh A, Hermjakob H, Kanehisa M, Kiley R, McEntyre J, McKibbin R, Miyano S, Pauly B, Perrimon N, Ragan MA, Richards G, Teo YY, Westerfield M, Westhof E, Lasko PF.
2017_Nature_Anderson.pdf
Valvezan AJ, Turner M, Belaid A, Lam HC, Miller SK, McNamara MC, et al. mTORC1 Couples Nucleotide Synthesis to Nucleotide Demand Resulting in a Targetable Metabolic Vulnerability. Cancer Cell. 2017;Abstract
The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) supports proliferation through parallel induction of key anabolic processes, including protein, lipid, and nucleotide synthesis. We hypothesized that these processes are coupled to maintain anabolic balance in cells with mTORC1 activation, a common event in human cancers. Loss of the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) tumor suppressors results in activation of mTORC1 and development of the tumor syndrome TSC. We find that pharmacological inhibitors of guanylate nucleotide synthesis have selective deleterious effects on TSC-deficient cells, including in mouse tumor models. This effect stems from replication stress and DNA damage caused by mTORC1-driven rRNA synthesis, which renders nucleotide pools limiting. These findings reveal a metabolic vulnerability downstream of mTORC1 triggered by anabolic imbalance.
2017_Cancer Cell_Valvezan.pdf Supplement.pdf
Ewen-Campen B, Mohr SE, Hu Y, Perrimon N. Accessing the Phenotype Gap: Enabling Systematic Investigation of Paralog Functional Complexity with CRISPR. Dev Cell. 2017;43 (1) :6-9. Abstract
Single-gene knockout experiments can fail to reveal function in the context of redundancy, which is frequently observed among duplicated genes (paralogs) with overlapping functions. We discuss the complexity associated with studying paralogs and outline how recent advances in CRISPR will help address the "phenotype gap" and impact biomedical research.
2017_Dev Cell_Ewen-Campen.pdf
Rajan A, Housden BE, Wirtz-Peitz F, Holderbaum L, Perrimon N. A Mechanism Coupling Systemic Energy Sensing to Adipokine Secretion. Dev Cell. 2017;43 (1) :83-98.e6. Abstract
Adipocytes sense systemic nutrient status and systemically communicate this information by releasing adipokines. The mechanisms that couple nutritional state to adipokine release are unknown. Here, we investigated how Unpaired 2 (Upd2), a structural and functional ortholog of the primary human adipokine leptin, is released from Drosophila fat cells. We find that Golgi reassembly stacking protein (GRASP), an unconventional secretion pathway component, is required for Upd2 secretion. In nutrient-rich fat cells, GRASP clusters in close proximity to the apical side of lipid droplets (LDs). During nutrient deprivation, glucagon-mediated increase in calcium (Ca(2+)) levels, via calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) phosphorylation, inhibits proximal GRASP localization to LDs. Using a heterologous cell system, we show that human leptin secretion is also regulated by Ca(2+) and CaMKII. In summary, we describe a mechanism by which increased cytosolic Ca(2+) negatively regulates adipokine secretion and have uncovered an evolutionarily conserved molecular link between intracellular Ca(2+) levels and energy homeostasis.
2017_Dev Cell_Rajan.pdf Supplemental Figures.pdf
Lee H-J, Jedrychowski MP, Vinayagam A, Wu N, Shyh-Chang N, Hu Y, et al. Proteomic and Metabolomic Characterization of a Mammalian Cellular Transition from Quiescence to Proliferation. Cell Rep. 2017;20 (3) :721-736. Abstract
There exist similarities and differences in metabolism and physiology between normal proliferative cells and tumor cells. Once a cell enters the cell cycle, metabolic machinery is engaged to facilitate various processes. The kinetics and regulation of these metabolic changes have not been properly evaluated. To correlate the orchestration of these processes with the cell cycle, we analyzed the transition from quiescence to proliferation of a non-malignant murine pro-B lymphocyte cell line in response to IL-3. Using multiplex mass-spectrometry-based proteomics, we show that the transition to proliferation shares features generally attributed to cancer cells: upregulation of glycolysis, lipid metabolism, amino-acid synthesis, and nucleotide synthesis and downregulation of oxidative phosphorylation and the urea cycle. Furthermore, metabolomic profiling of this transition reveals similarities to cancer-related metabolic pathways. In particular, we find that methionine is consumed at a higher rate than that of other essential amino acids, with a potential link to maintenance of the epigenome.
2017_Cell Rep_Lee.pdf Supplement.zip
Ewen-Campen B, Yang-Zhou D, Fernandes VR, González DP, Liu L-P, Tao R, et al. Optimized strategy for in vivo Cas9-activation in Drosophila. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017;114 (35) :9409-9414. Abstract
While several large-scale resources are available for in vivo loss-of-function studies in Drosophila, an analogous resource for overexpressing genes from their endogenous loci does not exist. We describe a strategy for generating such a resource using Cas9 transcriptional activators (CRISPRa). First, we compare a panel of CRISPRa approaches and demonstrate that, for in vivo studies, dCas9-VPR is the most optimal activator. Next, we demonstrate that this approach is scalable and has a high success rate, as >75% of the lines tested activate their target gene. We show that CRISPRa leads to physiologically relevant levels of target gene expression capable of generating strong gain-of-function (GOF) phenotypes in multiple tissues and thus serves as a useful platform for genetic screening. Based on the success of this CRISRPa approach, we are generating a genome-wide collection of flies expressing single-guide RNAs (sgRNAs) for CRISPRa. We also present a collection of more than 30 Gal4 > UAS:dCas9-VPR lines to aid in using these sgRNA lines for GOF studies in vivo.
2017_PNAS_Ewen-Campen.pdf Supplement.pdf
Hu Y, Comjean A, Mohr SE, FlyBase Consortium T, Perrimon N. Gene2Function: An Integrated Online Resource for Gene Function Discovery. G3 (Bethesda). 2017;Abstract
One of the most powerful ways to develop hypotheses regarding biological functions of conserved genes in a given species, such as in humans, is to first look at what is known about function in another species. Model organism databases (MODs) and other resources are rich with functional information but difficult to mine. Gene2Function (G2F) addresses a broad need by integrating information about conserved genes in a single online resource.
2017_G3_Hu.pdf Supplemental Methods.pdf Table S1.xlsx
Song W, Owusu-Ansah E, Hu Y, Cheng D, Ni X, Zirin J, et al. Activin signaling mediates muscle-to-adipose communication in a mitochondria dysfunction-associated obesity model. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017;Abstract
Mitochondrial dysfunction has been associated with obesity and metabolic disorders. However, whether mitochondrial perturbation in a single tissue influences mitochondrial function and metabolic status of another distal tissue remains largely unknown. We analyzed the nonautonomous role of muscular mitochondrial dysfunction in Drosophila Surprisingly, impaired muscle mitochondrial function via complex I perturbation results in simultaneous mitochondrial dysfunction in the fat body (the fly adipose tissue) and subsequent triglyceride accumulation, the major characteristic of obesity. RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis, in the context of muscle mitochondrial dysfunction, revealed that target genes of the TGF-β signaling pathway were induced in the fat body. Strikingly, expression of the TGF-β family ligand, Activin-β (Actβ), was dramatically increased in the muscles by NF-κB/Relish (Rel) signaling in response to mitochondrial perturbation, and decreasing Actβ expression in mitochondrial-perturbed muscles rescued both the fat body mitochondrial dysfunction and obesity phenotypes. Thus, perturbation of muscle mitochondrial activity regulates mitochondrial function in the fat body nonautonomously via modulation of Activin signaling.
2017_PNAS_Song.pdf Supplemental Info.pdf
Teleman AA, Perrimon N. Open questions: completing the parts list and finding the integrating signals. BMC Biol. 2017;15 (1) :47. Abstract
One of the great revelations of post-genomic biology has been the extent to which essential functions and mechanisms are conserved across vast phylogenetic distances. Because of this, we can look to the fruit fly for answers to pressing open questions on the unknown functions of genes and the mechanisms of their physiological integration.
2017_BMC Bio_Teleman.pdf
Xu C, Luo J, He L, Montell C, Perrimon N. Oxidative stress induces stem cell proliferation via TRPA1/RyR-mediated Ca(2+) signaling in the Drosophila midgut. Elife. 2017;6. Abstract
Precise regulation of stem cell activity is crucial for tissue homeostasis and necessary to prevent overproliferation. In the Drosophila adult gut, high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been detected with different types of tissue damage, and oxidative stress has been shown to be both necessary and sufficient to trigger intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation. However, the connection between oxidative stress and mitogenic signals remains obscure. In a screen for genes required for ISC proliferation in response to oxidative stress, we identified two regulators of cytosolic Ca(2+) levels, transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) and ryanodine receptor (RyR). Characterization of TRPA1 and RyR demonstrates that Ca(2+) signaling is required for oxidative stress-induced activation of the Ras/MAPK pathway, which in turns drives ISC proliferation. Our findings provide a link between redox regulation and Ca(2+) signaling and reveal a novel mechanism by which ISCs detect stress signals.
2017_eLife_Xu.pdf 2017_eLife_Xu_Videos_1-6.zip Supplemental Figures.pdf
Kang J, Shin S, Perrimon N, Shen J. An Evolutionarily Conserved Role of Presenilin in Neuronal Protection in the Aging Drosophila Brain. Genetics. 2017;Abstract

Mutations in the Presenilin genes are the major genetic cause of Alzheimer's disease. Presenilin and Nicastrin are essential components of γ-secretase, a multi-subunit protease that cleaves Type I transmembrane proteins. Genetic studies in mice previously demonstrated that conditional inactivation of Presenilin or Nicastrin in excitatory neurons of the postnatal forebrain results in memory deficits, synaptic impairment and age-dependent neurodegeneration. The roles of Drosophila Presenilin (Psn) and Nicastrin (Nct) in the adult fly brain, however, are unknown. To knockdown (KD) Psn or Nct selectively in neurons of the adult brain, we generated multiple shRNA lines. Using a ubiquitous driver, these shRNA lines resulted in 80-90% reduction of mRNA and pupal lethality, a phenotype that is shared with Psn and Nct mutants carrying nonsense mutations. Furthermore, expression of these shRNAs in the wing disc caused notching wing phenotypes, which are also shared with Psn and Nct mutants. Similar to Nct, neuron-specific Psn KD using two independent shRNA lines led to early mortality and rough eye phenotypes, which were rescued by a fly Psn transgene. Interestingly, conditional KD (cKD) of Psn or Nct in adult neurons using the elav-Gal4 and tubulin-Gal80(ts) system caused shortened lifespan, climbing defects, increases in apoptosis and age-dependent neurodegeneration. Together, these findings demonstrate that similar to their mammalian counterparts, Drosophila Psn and Nct are required for neuronal survival during aging and normal lifespan, highlighting an evolutionarily conserved role of Presenilin in neuronal protection in the aging brain.

2017_Genetics_Kang.pdf Table S1.pdf
Wang J, Al-Ouran R, Hu Y, Kim S-Y, Wan Y-W, Wangler MF, et al. MARRVEL: Integration of Human and Model Organism Genetic Resources to Facilitate Functional Annotation of the Human Genome. Am J Hum Genet. 2017;Abstract

One major challenge encountered with interpreting human genetic variants is the limited understanding of the functional impact of genetic alterations on biological processes. Furthermore, there remains an unmet demand for an efficient survey of the wealth of information on human homologs in model organisms across numerous databases. To efficiently assess the large volume of publically available information, it is important to provide a concise summary of the most relevant information in a rapid user-friendly format. To this end, we created MARRVEL (model organism aggregated resources for rare variant exploration). MARRVEL is a publicly available website that integrates information from six human genetic databases and seven model organism databases. For any given variant or gene, MARRVEL displays information from OMIM, ExAC, ClinVar, Geno2MP, DGV, and DECIPHER. Importantly, it curates model organism-specific databases to concurrently display a concise summary regarding the human gene homologs in budding and fission yeast, worm, fly, fish, mouse, and rat on a single webpage. Experiment-based information on tissue expression, protein subcellular localization, biological process, and molecular function for the human gene and homologs in the seven model organisms are arranged into a concise output. Hence, rather than visiting multiple separate databases for variant and gene analysis, users can obtain important information by searching once through MARRVEL. Altogether, MARRVEL dramatically improves efficiency and accessibility to data collection and facilitates analysis of human genes and variants by cross-disciplinary integration of 18 million records available in public databases to facilitate clinical diagnosis and basic research.

2017_Am J Hum Genet_Wang.pdf Supplemental Info.pdf
He L, Huang J, Perrimon N. Development of an optimized synthetic Notch receptor as an in vivo cell-cell contact sensor. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017;Abstract

Detection and manipulation of direct cell-cell contact in complex tissues is a fundamental and challenging problem in many biological studies. Here, we report an optimized Notch-based synthetic receptor (synNQ) useful to study direct cell-cell interactions in Drosophila With the synNQ system, cells expressing a synthetic receptor, which contains Notch activation machinery and a downstream transcriptional activator, QF, are activated by a synthetic GFP ligand expressed by contacting neighbor cells. To avoid cis-inhibition, mutually exclusive expression of the synthetic ligand and receptor is achieved using the "flippase-out" system. Expression of the synthetic GFP ligand is controlled by the Gal4/UAS system for easy and broad applications. Using synNQ, we successfully visualized cell-cell interactions within and between most fly tissues, revealing previously undocumented cell-cell contacts. Importantly, in addition to detection of cells in contact with one another, synNQ allows for genetic manipulation in all cells in contact with a targeted cell population, which we demonstrate in the context of cell competition in developing wing disks. Altogether, the synNQ genetic system will enable a broad range of studies of cell contact in developmental biology.

2017_PNAS_He.pdf Supplemental Info.pdf Dataset S1.pdf
Chen C-L, Perrimon N. Proximity-dependent labeling methods for proteomic profiling in living cells. Wiley Interdiscip Rev Dev Biol. 2017;Abstract

Characterizing the proteome composition of organelles and subcellular regions of living cells can facilitate the understanding of cellular organization as well as protein interactome networks. Proximity labeling-based methods coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) offer a high-throughput approach for systematic analysis of spatially restricted proteomes. Proximity labeling utilizes enzymes that generate reactive radicals to covalently tag neighboring proteins with biotin. The biotinylated endogenous proteins can then be isolated for further analysis by MS. To analyze protein-protein interactions or identify components that localize to discrete subcellular compartments, spatial expression is achieved by fusing the enzyme to specific proteins or signal peptides that target to particular subcellular regions. Although these technologies have only been introduced recently, they have already provided deep insights into a wide range of biological processes. Here, we describe and compare current methods of proximity labeling as well as their applications. As each method has its own unique features, the goal of this review is to describe how different proximity labeling methods can be used to answer different biological questions. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

2017_Interdis Rev Dev Bio_Chen.pdf
Chatterjee N, Perrimon N. Thermogenesis by THADA. Dev Cell. 2017;41 (1) :1-2. Abstract

THADA has been associated with cold adaptation and diabetes in humans, but the cellular and molecular basis of its function has been unknown. Moraru and colleagues (2017) report in this issue of Developmental Cell that it triggers thermogenesis by uncoupling ATP hydrolysis from calcium transport into the endoplasmic reticulum.

2017_Dev Cell_Chatterjee.pdf
Housden BE, Nicholson HE, Perrimon N. Synthetic Lethality Screens Using RNAi in Combination with CRISPR-based Knockout in Drosophila Cells. Bio-Protocol [Internet]. 2017;7 (3). Publisher's VersionAbstract

A synthetic lethal interaction is a type of genetic interaction where the disruption of either of two genes individually has little effect but their combined disruption is lethal. Knowledge of synthetic lethal interactions can allow for elucidation of network structure and identification of candidate drug targets for human diseases such as cancer. In Drosophila, combinatorial gene disruption has been achieved previously by combining multiple RNAi reagents. Here we describe a protocol for high-throughput combinatorial gene disruption by combining CRISPR and RNAi. This approach previously resulted in the identification of highly reproducible and conserved synthetic lethal interactions (Housden et al., 2015).

2017_Bio-Protocol_Housden.pdf
Song W, Cheng D, Hong S, Sappe B, Hu Y, Wei N, et al. Midgut-Derived Activin Regulates Glucagon-like Action in the Fat Body and Glycemic Control. Cell Metab. 2017;25 (2) :386-399. Abstract

While high-caloric diet impairs insulin response to cause hyperglycemia, whether and how counter-regulatory hormones are modulated by high-caloric diet is largely unknown. We find that enhanced response of Drosophila adipokinetic hormone (AKH, the glucagon homolog) in the fat body is essential for hyperglycemia associated with a chronic high-sugar diet. We show that the activin type I receptor Baboon (Babo) autonomously increases AKH signaling without affecting insulin signaling in the fat body via, at least, increase of Akh receptor (AkhR) expression. Further, we demonstrate that Activin-β (Actβ), an activin ligand predominantly produced in the enteroendocrine cells (EEs) of the midgut, is upregulated by chronic high-sugar diet and signals through Babo to promote AKH action in the fat body, leading to hyperglycemia. Importantly, activin signaling in mouse primary hepatocytes also increases glucagon response and glucagon-induced glucose production, indicating a conserved role for activin in enhancing AKH/glucagon signaling and glycemic control.

2017_Cell Metab_Song.pdf Supplemental Files.zip

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