Research Article

2021
Mohr SE, Tattikota SG, Xu J, Zirin J, Hu Y, Perrimon N. Methods and tools for spatial mapping of single-cell RNAseq clusters in Drosophila. Genetics. 2021;Abstract
Single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNAseq) experiments provide a powerful means to identify clusters of cells that share common gene expression signatures. A major challenge in scRNAseq studies is to map the clusters to specific anatomical regions along the body and within tissues. Existing data, such as information obtained from large-scale in situ RNA hybridization studies, cell type specific transcriptomics, gene expression reporters, antibody stainings, and fluorescent tagged proteins, can help to map clusters to anatomy. However, in many cases, additional validation is needed to precisely map the spatial location of cells in clusters. Several approaches are available for spatial resolution in Drosophila, including mining of existing datasets, and use of existing or new tools for direct or indirect detection of RNA, or direct detection of proteins. Here, we review available resources and emerging technologies that will facilitate spatial mapping of scRNAseq clusters at high resolution in Drosophila. Importantly, we discuss the need, available approaches, and reagents for multiplexing gene expression detection in situ, as in most cases scRNAseq clusters are defined by the unique coexpression of sets of genes.
2021_Genetics_Mohr.pdf
Cho S, Lee G, Pickering BF, Jang C, Park JH, He L, et al. mTORC1 promotes cell growth via mA-dependent mRNA degradation. Mol Cell. 2021;Abstract
Dysregulated mTORC1 signaling alters a wide range of cellular processes, contributing to metabolic disorders and cancer. Defining the molecular details of downstream effectors is thus critical for uncovering selective therapeutic targets. We report that mTORC1 and its downstream kinase S6K enhance eIF4A/4B-mediated translation of Wilms' tumor 1-associated protein (WTAP), an adaptor for the N-methyladenosine (mA) RNA methyltransferase complex. This regulation is mediated by 5' UTR of WTAP mRNA that is targeted by eIF4A/4B. Single-nucleotide-resolution mA mapping revealed that MAX dimerization protein 2 (MXD2) mRNA contains mA, and increased mA modification enhances its degradation. WTAP induces cMyc-MAX association by suppressing MXD2 expression, which promotes cMyc transcriptional activity and proliferation of mTORC1-activated cancer cells. These results elucidate a mechanism whereby mTORC1 stimulates oncogenic signaling via mA RNA modification and illuminates the WTAP-MXD2-cMyc axis as a potential therapeutic target for mTORC1-driven cancers.
2021_MolCell_Cho.pdf Supplement.zip
Parkhitko AA, Singh A, Hsieh S, Hu Y, Binari R, Lord CJ, et al. Cross-species identification of PIP5K1-, splicing- and ubiquitin-related pathways as potential targets for RB1-deficient cells. PLoS Genet. 2021;17 (2) :e1009354. Abstract
The RB1 tumor suppressor is recurrently mutated in a variety of cancers including retinoblastomas, small cell lung cancers, triple-negative breast cancers, prostate cancers, and osteosarcomas. Finding new synthetic lethal (SL) interactions with RB1 could lead to new approaches to treating cancers with inactivated RB1. We identified 95 SL partners of RB1 based on a Drosophila screen for genetic modifiers of the eye phenotype caused by defects in the RB1 ortholog, Rbf1. We validated 38 mammalian orthologs of Rbf1 modifiers as RB1 SL partners in human cancer cell lines with defective RB1 alleles. We further show that for many of the RB1 SL genes validated in human cancer cell lines, low activity of the SL gene in human tumors, when concurrent with low levels of RB1 was associated with improved patient survival. We investigated higher order combinatorial gene interactions by creating a novel Drosophila cancer model with co-occurring Rbf1, Pten and Ras mutations, and found that targeting RB1 SL genes in this background suppressed the dramatic tumor growth and rescued fly survival whilst having minimal effects on wild-type cells. Finally, we found that drugs targeting the identified RB1 interacting genes/pathways, such as UNC3230, PYR-41, TAK-243, isoginkgetin, madrasin, and celastrol also elicit SL in human cancer cell lines. In summary, we identified several high confidence, evolutionarily conserved, novel targets for RB1-deficient cells that may be further adapted for the treatment of human cancer.
2021_PLOS Gen_Parkhitko.pdf 2021_PLOS Gen_Parkhitko_Supp.zip
Wang W, Li J, Tan J, Wang M, Yang J, Zhang Z-M, et al. Endonuclease G promotes autophagy by suppressing mTOR signaling and activating the DNA damage response. Nat Commun. 2021;12 (1) :476. Abstract
Endonuclease G (ENDOG), a mitochondrial nuclease, is known to participate in many cellular processes, including apoptosis and paternal mitochondrial elimination, while its role in autophagy remains unclear. Here, we report that ENDOG released from mitochondria promotes autophagy during starvation, which we find to be evolutionally conserved across species by performing experiments in human cell lines, mice, Drosophila and C. elegans. Under starvation, Glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta-mediated phosphorylation of ENDOG at Thr-128 and Ser-288 enhances its interaction with 14-3-3γ, which leads to the release of Tuberin (TSC2) and Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase catalytic subunit type 3 (Vps34) from 14-3-3γ, followed by mTOR pathway suppression and autophagy initiation. Alternatively, ENDOG activates DNA damage response and triggers autophagy through its endonuclease activity. Our results demonstrate that ENDOG is a crucial regulator of autophagy, manifested by phosphorylation-mediated interaction with 14-3-3γ, and its endonuclease activity-mediated DNA damage response.
2021_Nat Comm_Wang.pdf Supplement.pdf
Tang H-W, Weng J-H, Lee WX, Hu Y, Gu L, Cho S, et al. mTORC1-chaperonin CCT signaling regulates mA RNA methylation to suppress autophagy. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2021;118 (10). Abstract
Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) is a central regulator of cell growth and metabolism that senses and integrates nutritional and environmental cues with cellular responses. Recent studies have revealed critical roles of mTORC1 in RNA biogenesis and processing. Here, we find that the mA methyltransferase complex (MTC) is a downstream effector of mTORC1 during autophagy in and human cells. Furthermore, we show that the Chaperonin Containing Tailless complex polypeptide 1 (CCT) complex, which facilitates protein folding, acts as a link between mTORC1 and MTC. The mTORC1 activates the chaperonin CCT complex to stabilize MTC, thereby increasing mA levels on the messenger RNAs encoding autophagy-related genes, leading to their degradation and suppression of autophagy. Altogether, our study reveals an evolutionarily conserved mechanism linking mTORC1 signaling with mA RNA methylation and demonstrates their roles in suppressing autophagy.
2021_PNAS_Hung.pdf 2021_PNAS_Hung_Supp.zip
Larkin A, Marygold SJ, Antonazzo G, Attrill H, Dos Santos G, Garapati PV, et al. FlyBase: updates to the Drosophila melanogaster knowledge base. Nucleic Acids Res. 2021;49 (D1) :D899-D907. Abstract
FlyBase (flybase.org) is an essential online database for researchers using Drosophila melanogaster as a model organism, facilitating access to a diverse array of information that includes genetic, molecular, genomic and reagent resources. Here, we describe the introduction of several new features at FlyBase, including Pathway Reports, paralog information, disease models based on orthology, customizable tables within reports and overview displays ('ribbons') of expression and disease data. We also describe a variety of recent important updates, including incorporation of a developmental proteome, upgrades to the GAL4 search tab, additional Experimental Tool Reports, migration to JBrowse for genome browsing and improvements to batch queries/downloads and the Fast-Track Your Paper tool.
2021_NucAcidsRes_Larkin.pdf
Bosch JA, Birchak G, Perrimon N. Precise genome engineering in using prime editing. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2021;118 (1). Abstract
Precise genome editing is a valuable tool to study gene function in model organisms. Prime editing, a precise editing system developed in mammalian cells, does not require double-strand breaks or donor DNA and has low off-target effects. Here, we applied prime editing for the model organism and developed conditions for optimal editing. By expressing prime editing components in cultured cells or somatic cells of transgenic flies, we precisely introduce premature stop codons in three classical visible marker genes, , , and Furthermore, by restricting editing to germ cells, we demonstrate efficient germ-line transmission of a precise edit in to 36% of progeny. Our results suggest that prime editing is a useful system in to study gene function, such as engineering precise point mutations, deletions, or epitope tags.
2021_PNAS_Bosch.pdf 2021_PNAS_Bosch_Supp.pdf
Hu Y, Comjean A, Rodiger J, Liu Y, Gao Y, Chung V, et al. FlyRNAi.org-the database of the Drosophila RNAi screening center and transgenic RNAi project: 2021 update. Nucleic Acids Res. 2021;49 (D1) :D908-D915. Abstract
The FlyRNAi database at the Drosophila RNAi Screening Center and Transgenic RNAi Project (DRSC/TRiP) provides a suite of online resources that facilitate functional genomics studies with a special emphasis on Drosophila melanogaster. Currently, the database provides: gene-centric resources that facilitate ortholog mapping and mining of information about orthologs in common genetic model species; reagent-centric resources that help researchers identify RNAi and CRISPR sgRNA reagents or designs; and data-centric resources that facilitate visualization and mining of transcriptomics data, protein modification data, protein interactions, and more. Here, we discuss updated and new features that help biological and biomedical researchers efficiently identify, visualize, analyze, and integrate information and data for Drosophila and other species. Together, these resources facilitate multiple steps in functional genomics workflows, from building gene and reagent lists to management, analysis, and integration of data.
2020_NucAcidsRes_Hu.pdf
2020
Chen C-L, Rodiger J, Chung V, Viswanatha R, Mohr SE, Hu Y, et al. SNP-CRISPR: A Web Tool for SNP-Specific Genome Editing. G3 (Bethesda). 2020;10 (2) :489-494. Abstract
CRISPR-Cas9 is a powerful genome editing technology in which a single guide RNA (sgRNA) confers target site specificity to achieve Cas9-mediated genome editing. Numerous sgRNA design tools have been developed based on reference genomes for humans and model organisms. However, existing resources are not optimal as genetic mutations or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the targeting region affect the efficiency of CRISPR-based approaches by interfering with guide-target complementarity. To facilitate identification of sgRNAs (1) in non-reference genomes, (2) across varying genetic backgrounds, or (3) for specific targeting of SNP-containing alleles, for example, disease relevant mutations, we developed a web tool, SNP-CRISPR (https://www.flyrnai.org/tools/snp_crispr/). SNP-CRISPR can be used to design sgRNAs based on public variant data sets or user-identified variants. In addition, the tool computes efficiency and specificity scores for sgRNA designs targeting both the variant and the reference. Moreover, SNP-CRISPR provides the option to upload multiple SNPs and target single or multiple nearby base changes simultaneously with a single sgRNA design. Given these capabilities, SNP-CRISPR has a wide range of potential research applications in model systems and for design of sgRNAs for disease-associated variant correction.
2020_G3_Chen.pdf
Hu Y, Chung V, Comjean A, Rodiger J, Nipun F, Perrimon N, et al. BioLitMine: Advanced Mining of Biomedical and Biological Literature About Human Genes and Genes from Major Model Organisms. G3 (Bethesda). 2020;10 (12) :4531-4539. Abstract
The accumulation of biological and biomedical literature outpaces the ability of most researchers and clinicians to stay abreast of their own immediate fields, let alone a broader range of topics. Although available search tools support identification of relevant literature, finding relevant and key publications is not always straightforward. For example, important publications might be missed in searches with an official gene name due to gene synonyms. Moreover, ambiguity of gene names can result in retrieval of a large number of irrelevant publications. To address these issues and help researchers and physicians quickly identify relevant publications, we developed BioLitMine, an advanced literature mining tool that takes advantage of the medical subject heading (MeSH) index and gene-to-publication annotations already available for PubMed literature. Using BioLitMine, a user can identify what MeSH terms are represented in the set of publications associated with a given gene of the interest, or start with a term and identify relevant publications. Users can also use the tool to find co-cited genes and a build a literature co-citation network. In addition, BioLitMine can help users build a gene list relevant to a MeSH term, such as a list of genes relevant to "stem cells" or "breast neoplasms." Users can also start with a gene or pathway of interest and identify authors associated with that gene or pathway, a feature that makes it easier to identify experts who might serve as collaborators or reviewers. Altogether, BioLitMine extends the value of PubMed-indexed literature and its existing expert curation by providing a robust and gene-centric approach to retrieval of relevant information.
2020_G3_Hu.pdf
Parkhitko AA, Ramesh D, Wang L, Leshchiner D, Filine E, Binari R, et al. Downregulation of the tyrosine degradation pathway extends lifespan. Elife. 2020;9. Abstract
Aging is characterized by extensive metabolic reprogramming. To identify metabolic pathways associated with aging, we analyzed age-dependent changes in the metabolomes of long-lived . Among the metabolites that changed, levels of tyrosine were increased with age in long-lived flies. We demonstrate that the levels of enzymes in the tyrosine degradation pathway increase with age in wild-type flies. Whole-body and neuronal-specific downregulation of enzymes in the tyrosine degradation pathway significantly extends lifespan, causes alterations of metabolites associated with increased lifespan, and upregulates the levels of tyrosine-derived neuromediators. Moreover, feeding wild-type flies with tyrosine increased their lifespan. Mechanistically, we show that suppression of ETC complex I drives the upregulation of enzymes in the tyrosine degradation pathway, an effect that can be rescued by tigecycline, an FDA-approved drug that specifically suppresses mitochondrial translation. In addition, tyrosine supplementation partially rescued lifespan of flies with ETC complex I suppression. Altogether, our study highlights the tyrosine degradation pathway as a regulator of longevity.
2020_eLife_Parkhitko.pdf
Ingaramo MC, Sánchez JA, Perrimon N, Dekanty A. Fat Body p53 Regulates Systemic Insulin Signaling and Autophagy under Nutrient Stress via Drosophila Upd2 Repression. Cell Rep. 2020;33 (4) :108321. Abstract
The tumor suppressor p53 regulates multiple metabolic pathways at the cellular level. However, its role in the context of a whole animal response to metabolic stress is poorly understood. Using Drosophila, we show that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent Dmp53 activation is critical for sensing nutrient stress, maintaining metabolic homeostasis, and extending organismal survival. Under both nutrient deprivation and high-sugar diet, Dmp53 activation in the fat body represses expression of the Drosophila Leptin analog, Unpaired-2 (Upd2), which remotely controls Dilp2 secretion in insulin-producing cells. In starved Dmp53-depleted animals, elevated Upd2 expression in adipose cells and activation of Upd2 receptor Domeless in the brain result in sustained Dilp2 circulating levels and impaired autophagy induction at a systemic level, thereby reducing nutrient stress survival. These findings demonstrate an essential role for the AMPK-Dmp53 axis in nutrient stress responses and expand the concept that adipose tissue acts as a sensing organ that orchestrates systemic adaptation to nutrient status.
2020_Cell Rep_Ingaramo.pdf
Ghosh AC, Tattikota SG, Liu Y, Comjean A, Hu Y, Barrera V, et al. PDGF/VEGF signaling from muscles to hepatocyte-like cells protects against obesity. Elife. 2020;9. Abstract
PDGF/VEGF ligands regulate a plethora of biological processes in multicellular organisms via autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine mechanisms. We investigated organ-specific metabolic roles of PDGF/VEGF-like factors (Pvfs). We combine genetic approaches and single-nuclei sequencing to demonstrate that muscle-derived Pvf1 signals to the hepatocyte-like cells/oenocytes to suppress lipid synthesis by activating the Pi3K/Akt1/TOR signaling cascade in the oenocytes. Functionally, this signaling axis regulates expansion of adipose tissue lipid stores in newly eclosed flies. Flies emerge after pupation with limited adipose tissue lipid stores and lipid level is progressively accumulated via lipid synthesis. We find that adult muscle-specific expression of increases rapidly during this stage and that muscle-to-oenocyte Pvf1 signaling inhibits expansion of adipose tissue lipid stores as the process reaches completion. Our findings provide the first evidence in a metazoan of a PDGF/VEGF ligand acting as a myokine that regulates systemic lipid homeostasis by activating TOR in hepatocyte-like cells.
2020_eLife_Ghosh_corrected.pdf
Xia B, Amador G, Viswanatha R, Zirin J, Mohr SE, Perrimon N. CRISPR-based engineering of gene knockout cells by homology-directed insertion in polyploid Drosophila S2R+ cells. Nat Protoc. 2020;15 (10) :3478-3498. Abstract
Precise and efficient genome modifications provide powerful tools for biological studies. Previous CRISPR gene knockout methods in cell lines have relied on frameshifts caused by stochastic insertion/deletion in all alleles. However, this method is inefficient for genes with high copy number due to polyploidy or gene amplification because frameshifts in all alleles can be difficult to generate and detect. Here we describe a homology-directed insertion method to knockout genes in the polyploid Drosophila S2R+ cell line. This protocol allows generation of homozygous mutant cell lines using an insertion cassette which autocatalytically generates insertion mutations in all alleles. Knockout cells generated using this method can be directly identified by PCR without a need for DNA sequencing. This protocol takes 2-3 months and can be applied to other polyploid cell lines or high-copy-number genes.
2020_Nature Prot_Xia.pdf Supplement.pdf
Ewen-Campen B, Comyn T, Vogt E, Perrimon N. No Evidence that Wnt Ligands Are Required for Planar Cell Polarity in Drosophila. Cell Rep. 2020;32 (10) :108121. Abstract
The frizzled (fz) and dishevelled (dsh) genes are highly conserved members of both the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway and the Wnt signaling pathway. Given these dual functions, several studies have examined whether Wnt ligands provide a tissue-scale orientation cue for PCP establishment during development, and these studies have reached differing conclusions. Here, we re-examine this issue in the Drosophila melanogaster wing and notum using split-Gal4 co-expression analysis, multiplex somatic CRISPR, and double RNAi experiments. Pairwise loss-of-function experiments targeting wg together with other Wnt genes, via somatic CRISPR or RNAi, do not produce PCP defects in the wing or notum. In addition, somatic CRISPR against evi (aka wntless), which is required for the secretion of Wnt ligands, did not produce detectable PCP phenotypes. Altogether, our results do not support the hypothesis that Wnt ligands contribute to PCP signaling in the Drosophila wing or notum.
2020_Cell Rep_Ewen-Campen.pdf Supplement.pdf
Cho B, Yoon S-H, Lee D, Koranteng F, Tattikota SG, Cha N, et al. Single-cell transcriptome maps of myeloid blood cell lineages in Drosophila. Nat Commun. 2020;11 (1) :4483. Abstract
The Drosophila lymph gland, the larval hematopoietic organ comprised of prohemocytes and mature hemocytes, has been a valuable model for understanding mechanisms underlying hematopoiesis and immunity. Three types of mature hemocytes have been characterized in the lymph gland: plasmatocytes, lamellocytes, and crystal cells, which are analogous to vertebrate myeloid cells, yet molecular underpinnings of the lymph gland hemocytes have been less investigated. Here, we use single-cell RNA sequencing to comprehensively analyze heterogeneity of developing hemocytes in the lymph gland, and discover previously undescribed hemocyte types including adipohemocytes, stem-like prohemocytes, and intermediate prohemocytes. Additionally, we identify the developmental trajectory of hemocytes during normal development as well as the emergence of the lamellocyte lineage following active cellular immunity caused by wasp infestation. Finally, we establish similarities and differences between embryonically derived- and larval lymph gland hemocytes. Altogether, our study provides detailed insights into the hemocyte development and cellular immune responses at single-cell resolution.
2020_Nature Comm_Cho.pdf Supplement.pdf
Bajpai A, Quazi TA, Tang H-W, Manzar N, Singh V, Thakur A, et al. A model of oral peptide therapeutics for adult intestinal stem cell tumors. Dis Model Mech. 2020;13 (7). Abstract
Peptide therapeutics, unlike small-molecule drugs, display crucial advantages of target specificity and the ability to block large interacting interfaces, such as those of transcription factors. The transcription co-factor of the Hippo pathway, YAP/Yorkie (Yki), has been implicated in many cancers, and is dependent on its interaction with the DNA-binding TEAD/Sd proteins via a large Ω-loop. In addition, the mammalian vestigial-like (VGLL) proteins, specifically their TONDU domain, competitively inhibit YAP-TEAD interaction, resulting in arrest of tumor growth. Here, we show that overexpression of the TONDU peptide or its oral uptake leads to suppression of Yki-driven intestinal stem cell tumors in the adult midgut. In addition, comparative proteomic analyses of peptide-treated and untreated tumors, together with chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, reveal that integrin pathway members are part of the Yki-oncogenic network. Collectively, our findings establish as a reliable platform to screen for cancer oral therapeutic peptides and reveal a tumor suppressive role for integrins in Yki-driven tumors.This article has an associated First Person interview with the first author of the paper.
2020_DMM_Bajpai.pdf
Tattikota SG, Cho B, Liu Y, Hu Y, Barrera V, Steinbaugh MJ, et al. A single-cell survey of blood. Elife. 2020;9. Abstract
blood cells, called hemocytes, are classified into plasmatocytes, crystal cells, and lamellocytes based on the expression of a few marker genes and cell morphologies, which are inadequate to classify the complete hemocyte repertoire. Here, we used single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) to map hemocytes across different inflammatory conditions in larvae. We resolved plasmatocytes into different states based on the expression of genes involved in cell cycle, antimicrobial response, and metabolism together with the identification of intermediate states. Further, we discovered rare subsets within crystal cells and lamellocytes that express fibroblast growth factor (FGF) ligand and receptor , respectively. We demonstrate that these FGF components are required for mediating effective immune responses against parasitoid wasp eggs, highlighting a novel role for FGF signaling in inter-hemocyte crosstalk. Our scRNA-seq analysis reveals the diversity of hemocytes and provides a rich resource of gene expression profiles for a systems-level understanding of their functions.
2020_eLife_Tattikota.pdf
Kim K, Lane EA, Saftien A, Wang H, Xu Y, Wirtz-Peitz F, et al. as a model for studying cystic fibrosis pathophysiology of the gastrointestinal system. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2020;117 (19) :10357-10367. Abstract
Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a recessive disease caused by mutations in the () gene. The most common symptoms include progressive lung disease and chronic digestive conditions. CF is the first human genetic disease to benefit from having five different species of animal models. Despite the phenotypic differences among the animal models and human CF, these models have provided invaluable insight into understanding disease mechanisms at the organ-system level. Here, we identify a member of the ABCC4 family, CG5789, that has the structural and functional properties expected for encoding the equivalent of human CFTR, and thus refer to it as (). We show that knockdown of in the adult intestine disrupts osmotic homeostasis and displays CF-like phenotypes that lead to intestinal stem cell hyperplasia. We also show that expression of wild-type human , but not mutant variants of CFTR that prevent plasma membrane expression, rescues the mutant phenotypes of Furthermore, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq)-based transcriptomic analysis using fly intestine and identified a mucin gene, , which is required for proper intestinal barrier protection. Altogether, our findings suggest that can be a powerful model organism for studying CF pathophysiology.
2020_PNAS_Kim.pdf Supplement.pdf
Vásquez-Procopio J, Osorio B, Cortés-Martínez L, Hernández-Hernández F, Medina-Contreras O, Ríos-Castro E, et al. Intestinal response to dietary manganese depletion in Drosophila. Metallomics. 2020;12 (2) :218-240. Abstract
Manganese is considered essential for animal growth. Manganese ions serve as cofactors to three mitochondrial enzymes: superoxide dismutase (Sod2), arginase and glutamine synthase, and to glycosyltransferases residing in the Golgi. In Drosophila melanogaster, manganese has also been implicated in the formation of ceramide phosphoethanolamine, the insect's sphingomyelin analogue, a structural component of cellular membranes. Manganese overload leads to neurodegeneration and toxicity in both humans and Drosophila. Here, we report specific absorption and accumulation of manganese during the first week of adulthood in flies, which correlates with an increase in Sod2 activity during the same period. To test the requirement of dietary manganese for this accumulation, we generated a Drosophila model of manganese deficiency. Due to the lack of manganese-specific chelators, we used chemically defined media to grow the flies and deplete them of the metal. Dietary manganese depletion reduced Sod2 activity. We then examined gene and protein expression changes in the intestines of manganese depleted flies. We found adaptive responses to the presumed loss of known manganese-dependent enzymatic activities: less glutamine synthase activity (amination of glutamate to glutamine) was compensated by 50% reduction in glutaminase (deamination of glutamine to glutamate); less glycosyltransferase activity, predicted to reduce protein glycosylation, was compensated by 30% reduction in lysosomal mannosidases (protein deglycosylating enzymes); less ceramide phosphoethanolamine synthase activity was compensated by 30% reduction in the Drosophila sphingomyeline phospodiesterase, which could catabolize ceramide phosphoethanolamine in flies. Reduced Sod2 activity, predicted to cause superoxide-dependent iron-sulphur cluster damage, resulted in cellular iron misregulation.
2020_RSC_Vasquez-Procopio.pdf Supp. Figures.pdf Supp. Tables.zip

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