Current Lab Members

Andrey     Parkhitko, Ph.D.

Andrey Parkhitko, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral Fellow
I received my Ph.D. from the Russian State Medical University (Moscow). Under the exchange program I performed my graduate studies at Dr. Henske’s laboratory in Fox Chase Cancer Center (Philadelphia) and Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School (Boston). During my graduate studies I was investigating the role of autophagy and altered metabolism in the pathogenesis and treatment of Tuberous Sclerosis and Lymphangioleiomyomatosis. Currently, I am interested in the using tumor models in Drosophilafor the search of new modulators of tumorigenesis. I am also interested in the studying the metabolic alterations and their potential targeting during aging.
Afroditi Petsakou

Afroditi Petsakou, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral Fellow
I received my Ph.D. from NYU in the lab of Prof. Justin Blau, where I studied how circadian rhythms control neuronal structural plasticity. For my post-doc in the Perrimon Lab I am investigating the role of enteric neurons in intestinal regeneration.
Rajee Rajakumar

Rajee Rajakumar, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral Fellow
I received my Ph.D. in Biology at McGill University in the lab of Ehab Abouheif studying the developmental basis of caste evolution in ants at the level of genes, hormones, and epigenetics. I was then a postdoctoral fellow in the lab of Martin J. Cohn at the University of Florida, where I used skates and sharks to investigate the evolutionary and developmental origins of key vertebrate traits. As a post-doc in the Perrimon lab, I am utilizing Drosophila genetics to address some of the elusive mechanistic questions that I have generated over the years with non-model organisms.
Pedro Saavedra

Pedro Saavedra, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral Fellow
I received my Ph.D. in Developmental Biology from the University of Cambridge, UK, under the supervision of Dr Peter Lawrence and Dr Isabel Palacios. I used the Drosophila larval epidermis to study the link between planar cell polarity and patterning of tissues during development. Then I had a brief stint in Dr Steven Cohen lab in the IMCB, Singapore, to study how microRNA regulate metabolism and growth. In the Perrimon Lab, my research is focused on muscle degeneration. In particular, I am studying the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in muscle wasting during cancer-induced cachexia.
Ankita_Singh.jpg

Ankita Singh

Postdoctoral Fellow

I received my Ph.D. in Molecular and Human Genetics under the supervision of Prof. Ashim Mukherjee from Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India. As a graduate student I got an opportunity to work on identification and functional characterization of novel interactors of Notch Signaling pathway in Drosophila melanogaster. As a post-doc in the Perrimon lab, I am interested to explore the mechanism of regulation of different signaling components and their cross-talk during development using molecular genetic approaches in Drosophila.

Hong-Wen     Tang, Ph.D.

Hong-Wen Tang, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral Fellow
I received my Ph.D. from the Institute of Biochemistry at National Taiwan University under the supervision by Dr. Guang-Chao Chen. Currently, I focus on the how oncogenic signaling pathways regulate of RNA processing and cellular metabolisms.
Sudhir Tattikota

Sudhir Tattikota, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral Fellow
I earned my Ph.D. from the Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Germany, where I studied the role of the microRNA pathway in maintaining the function of pancreatic beta cells. Using several cellular and mouse model systems, I could demonstrate how Argonaute2 regulates secretome and proliferation of the beta cells. As a postdoc in the Perrimon Lab, I am integrating emerging technologies including CRISPR and single cell transcriptomics to delineate mechanisms governing blood cell homeostasis and characterize novel blood cell populations in Drosophila. In the future, I aim to focus on immunometabolism by understanding the dynamics of hematopoiesis during disease states such as Diabetes and Cancer. My other activities include running 10Ks, besides just running gels in the lab.
Ram Viswanatha

Raghuvir Viswanatha, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral Fellow
I am intrigued by the dynamic regulation of subcellular compartments in eukaryotic cells. I got my Ph.D. from Tony Bretscher’s lab at Cornell University through studies of the dynamic spatial and temporal regulation of a key cytoskeletal protein, ezrin, by its kinase. Manipulating the dynamics led to the reversible, selective loss of a subcellular structure called microvilli. In the Perrimon Lab, I hope to use proteomics and functional genomics to obtain a detailed parts list for many more subcellular components with the goal of gaining broad insight into their formation, the regulation of their abundance and morphology, their evolution, and their involvement in tissue-specific cell functions.
Baolong Xia

Baolong Xia, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral Fellow
I received my Ph.D. in Prof. Qi Zhou's lab at the Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2017. My graduate work focused on pluripotency regulation and ploidy maintenance of embryonic stem cells. In Prof. Perrimon's lab, I am taking genome wide genetic screening to study molecular sensing and homeostatic maintaining in the negative entropy system of life.
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Jun Xu, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral Fellow
I received my Ph.D. from Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences under the supervision by Dr. Yongping Huang and Dr. Anjiang Tan, where I studied the sex determination and spider silk production by using silkworm as a model. In the Perrimon Lab, I want to establish new immunological methods to dissect the inter-organ communication network with high sensitivity. 

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